Editor’s Note: A sign of the sucky economy: Mexican immigrants are pouring south across the border to their Motherland, self deporting if you will.
The Mexican educational system is confronted with an issue they never expected would happen; teaching Spanish as a second language to the returning Migrant children. Rich or well off Mexicans are fleeing the terrorism of the drug war, and less well off Mexicans are fleeing the eternal recession that is the everyday economy now of the United States. Where do Native Born Americans flee to?
November 20, 2012 – Education News

Frontera NorteSurIn different migrant-sending regions of Mexico, educators are coping with the new challenge of teaching children of return migrants who speak little or no Spanish. In the north-central state of Zacatecas, for instance, 150 teachers began a crash course this month in English to help them communicate with new students coming from the United States.

Sponsored by the state education department, the class will consist of 60 hours of Saturday sessions, video-conferences and field work. Antonio Jacobo de Luna, Zacatecas under-secretary for educational planning and support, said the new teacher program is addressing the concerns of U.S.-based migrant clubs from Zacatecas that got in touch with state officials about the presence of young, primarily English speakers suddenly thrust into a Spanish-language learning environment.

Dozens of such children are said to be in a language-challenged situation after relocating with their families to Zacatecas. The English course will be offered to educators at 54 schools in the municipalities of Tlaltenango, Jalpa, Jerez, Fresnillo, Rio Grande, Guadalupe, and Zacatecas. As an aid to students, the state education department has also given some pupils free bilingual Spanish-English textbooks.

In the southwestern state of Michoacan, educational authorities are also working on the issue of migrant family students from the U.S. Through two programs, Binational Migrant and Basic Education without Borders, the Michoacan state education department is conducting workshops in the municipalities of Tacambaro and Pedernales that are designed to ease the stress of a new school system and temper cultural shocks experienced by students.

In addition to language problems, new students also confront problems in having their U.S. studies properly accredited. To help parents overcome bureaucratic hurdles, the Binational Migrant initiative maintains an office in the state capital of Morelia.

A dozen children have been identified as needing special language and credit transfer assistance needs in Tacambaro and Pedernales. Michoacan education officials are likewise focusing on the emerging issue in other zones of a state which has long been at the forefront of the historic migration from Mexico to the U.S. and now back again, to some extent.

The local educational system began to grapple with a growing pedagogical challenge after economic crisis and U.S. immigration policies pushed more people back to Michoacan.

Sources: La Jornada, November 19, 2012. Article by Alfredo Valadez Rodriguez. La Jornada (Michoacan edition), October 24, 2012.

Frontera NorteSur: on-line, U.S.-Mexico border news
Center for Latin American and Border Studies
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, New Mexico

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Edgardo

Author: Edgardo

Born in Houston, Texas and moved to Raymondvile, Texas in 1969. Family bought a radio station and helped with the family business until it was sold in 1997. Since then started an agency and mostly writes about experiences in Deep South Texas. Writers of the Rio Grande founder, editor and contributing author.

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